Home insulation is not a new concept in the UK, although it has had somewhat of a resurgence in the last few years This has culminated in the UK Government’s recent rolling out of their Green Homes Grant (more information), which provides homeowners and landlords with funding to make their properties greener and more energy efficient.

The responsibility for insulating and properly caring for properties in this way falls on whoever owns the property and therefore tenants and residents who have a landlord or management company will need to discuss improvements to insulation with the relevant, managing party.

 

Property-insulation

 

How Does It All Work?

The process of insulating a property and making it more energy efficient is fairly simple and there are a number of ways in which it can be achieved, with the most popular methods being:

  • Installing a new boiler
  • Installing double glazing
  • Loft insulation
  • Cavity wall insulation
  • Under-floor insulation

 

Installing a New Boiler

Older boilers are not as efficient as newer models, which utilise gas more efficiently. As boilers age, they also tend to run in to various problems (particularly when they are not properly serviced over the years) such as fan and motor problems and components of the boiler becoming aged and overused. Although it is entirely possible to keep boilers running for many decades, as time goes on, the boiler is more likely to use more gas less efficiently, being worse for the environment and your bills.

 

Installing Double Glazing

A tried and tested method for improving energy efficiency and improving the integrity of the building in question’s envelope (the barrier that separates the inside and outside environments.) The better the protection between the interior and exterior environments, the better heat will be retained in the cooler months and cooler air maintained in the hotter months. Also, double glazing will help keep the property at a more stable temperature, putting less strain on the heating and therefore boiler.

 

Loft Insulation

The loft or attic of a property is usually where much of the heat is lost from the property in question. Heat rises and therefore it is logical that the highest point of the property [the loft] ill be where a large amount of heat is lost. Insulating the loft and attic means that less heat will be lost and will be contained within your property, allowing for less work being required by the central heating and boiler.

 

Cavity Wall Insulation

In the case of many early 20th Century properties, there is a gap [cavity] between the interior wall of the property and the exterior wall. This was designed so that the elements outside such as the rain and moisture cannot penetrate into the property. However, a major drawback of these designs of property is that the cavity allows cold air to infiltrate by filling the cavity, the building envelope is better secured and the property will be more energy efficient, greener and better for the environment.

 

Under-Floor Insulation

Surprising to many people is that the underfloor region of their property is poorly insulated. Underneath the flooring you will have in your property, be it carpet or otherwise, there will be the floorboards and underneath will be the joists, supporting the floor and then usually, a gaping space. this space allows for cold air to penetrate, making the property less energy efficient. Fixing this by insulating this is a great way to improve the energy efficiency and retention of your property.