mezzanine finance

Is Mezzanine Financing Right For Me?

Who is Mezzanine Finance For?

Mezzanine finance can be the right option for those looking to develop a high-risk, high-potential project. It can be a way to borrow a large amount of capital in the short-run with flexible repayment. Depending on the project, it is worth considering all options including bridging loans, development finance and speaking with expert investors.

 

Am I Eligible for Mezzanine Finance?

Before deciding whether mezzanine finance is the right choice for you, it is worth checking whether or not you are eligible to receive it.

The eligibility criteria for mezzanine finance with Octagon Capital are the following:

  • You must be based in UK, Scotland or Wales
  • Must offer up to 20% in equity
  • All properties considered including commercial and residential
  • All credit histories considered
  • Must be a limited company

 

What are the Advantages of Mezzanine Finance?

For companies looking to borrow money, there are many benefits to mezzanine financing. Not only does it provide them access to capital, it can often mean borrowing more money than traditional loans can offer. Borrowers can also minimise their equity dilution rather than trading a substation amount of equity for capital.

 

mezzanine-finance

 

One of the key benefits of mezzanine financing is flexible repayment for borrowers. There are multiple options available including cash, adding to the loan balance or providing equity for the lenders. It also allows them an element of flexibility when presenting debt as they are able to list mezzanine loans as equity on their company balance sheet. Additionally, interest payments can be deductible to the business.

 

What are the Drawbacks?

Like any loan, there is always a financial risk. Mezzanine financing is typically synonymous with high interest rates. As such, businesses may be faced with big debts in the case of company failure. One of the conditions of mezzanine loans is that if borrowers are unable to make repayment in cash, they may have to recompense lenders with equity interests. Because this type of financing is a high risk for lenders, it means that lenders can set high interest rates or make other specific demands.

 

How Much Does Mezzanine Finance Cost?

 

mezzanine-loans

 

Mezzanine loans can be more expensive than traditional types of borrowing, interest rates typically starting at around 12% per annum.

However, the true cost of a mezzanine loan will vary from borrower to borrower, depending on the circumstances and the details provided during the loan application.

If you want to find out more about mezzanine finance, including the costs involved you can call us on 0333 414 1491 or email sales@octagoncapital.co.uk.

 

Lender Perspective: Is it a good idea to provide mezzanine financing?

One of the biggest advantages for lenders is the high interest rates associated with mezzanine financing. To balance out the high risk, it means that the eventual pay out can be very high. Additionally, lenders could potentially receive equity. If a business succeeds, this could be hugely profitable for the lender.

Despite the pros, it is important to note the high risk nature of this type of financing. Whilst lenders are always at risk of losing money to default, this is especially true for mezzanine loans. Additionally, the fact that they are considered “low priority” loans means that, in a worst case scenario of bankruptcy, lenders risk never being repaid.


mezzanine-loans

How Do Mezzanine Loans Work?

  • Mezzanine loans blend equity and debt and sits somewhere between senior debt and equity
  • They are associated with high interest rates but flexible repayment plans
  • Mezzanine financing can be advantageous for companies looking to accelerate at a faster rate than traditional lenders can offer

 

How do Mezzanine Loans Work?

Mezzanine financing acts as a capital resource and falls between senior debt and equity. Through this, it maximises the total leverage with negligible equity dilution. The terms and conditions of a mezzanine loan are dependent on the agreement between a business and the lender. For lenders, mezzanine loans balance out the high risk with potential for extremely high rate of return, often receiving annual rates of between 12% and 20%, and even as high as 30%.

When working as a mezzanine lender, it is recommendable to work with an already established company with a successful history of business transactions. If investing in a less established business or start-up, the stakes are higher, and there is more risk. As such, the interest rate may be higher and the repayment plan more flexible. Whatever the agreed terms, mezzanine loans blend debt and company equity to benefit both parties. Typically, mezzanine loans have a fixed interest rate with no amortisation.

 

Characteristics of a Mezzanine Loan

  • They are subordinate loan and are low priority compared to senior debt but take priority over common stock
  • They have higher yield potential than ordinary debt
  • There is no amortisation
  • Repayment is usually flexible: Mezzanine loans can be structured as part fixed and part variable interest
  • They are commonly unsecured debts (not backed by collateral)

Repayment Plans and Interest Rates

Mezzanine loans are associated with higher costs than traditional borrowing. Lenders can ask for traditional repayment (often in the double-digits) or they could request equity exposure in order to supplement the interest.

 

Mezzanine-loan-repayments

Repayment plans tend to be more flexible with these types of loans. For businesses, cash flow is not always available. Mezzanine loans recognise this and, as such, offer the option for companies to capitalise interest charge by means of ‘payment in kind’ (PIK). This means that the company is able to offer repayment in a form other than cash. This can be a good or service but, in this case, typically refers to bonds, stock or equity.

When Do you Have To Pay Back an Equity Loan?

Mezzanine loans are an example of a subordinated loan. This means that they are low priority for repayment. In the event of a business failing, it is possible that they are not able to cover all of their debts. In the hierarchy of repayment, mezzanine loan repayment is low priority and can only be paid after all other, high priority payments have been covered. Top priority payments are usually the banks and senior shareholders. Mezzanine loans are further down the list than these payments but they fall above common equity.

 


senior-debt

Mezzanine Finance vs Senior Debt

What is Senior Debt?

Senior debt refers to the level of priority a loan repayment holds. This type of debt has priority over other repayments meaning that it is borrowed money which a company must first repay if it goes out of business. Senior debt has priority over all other classes of debt and other classes of equity. Subsequently, if a company is suffering financial difficulties or liquidation, these debt holders will have a priority claim.

 

Which Loans are Classified As Senior Debt?

The majority of secure loans would be classified as senior debt. Loans taken out from banks, other financial institutions and high-grade debt securities including mortgage bonds would all be considered senior debt.

 

Secured-loan-with-property

 

Subsequently, this type of debt is considered “low-risk” from a lender perspective. These loans are often issued by large and secure financial institutions with pooled capital. Due to this, these loans typically offers a lower interest rate than subordinate loans.

 

Order of Priorities

Each type of financial assistance has a different priority level when being repaid. Senior debt takes priority over other borrowed money if a company enters financial problems and is the first tier of liabilities for a company. They are considered top priority as they are usually secured against collateral. Junior or subordinated debt falls lower on the list meaning that a company has less pressure to pay back these loans. However, this comes at the price of higher interest rates. Preferred stockholders are lower still and common stockholders are last on the list.

 

Junior Debt

Junior debt, also known as subordinate debt, takes a lower priority position because of their relative high risk. Yet, they generally pay greater yields than other loans. As such, it is riskier for an investor to own but can deliver a higher rate of return. These creditors have access to a company’s assets only after the senior debt has been repaid.

 

How Does Senior Debt Differ from Mezzanine Finance?

Mezzanine finance is a type of junior debt meaning is it lower in the list of priorities when paying off debt. This is compensated by the high potential that they offer lenders. Mezzanine loans are typically high-yield and high-risk and combine debt and equity.

Octagon Capital allows you to take out as much as £25 million in a mezzanine finance loan, much higher than you would be able to obtain financial institutions or banks. However, to balance this out, a lender also takes a stake of the business due to its high potential. Unlike senior debt, mezzanine finance is not secured against any form of collateral.


new-home-regulations

The Regulations You Need to Be Aware of When Buying a New Home

Buying a home is both exciting and terrifying at the same time. It is a process that can throw surprises at you along the way, that can become increasingly expensive the more you dig and yet can leave you residing in your dream property when it concludes.

There are few regulations placed upon you as a buyer, but there are aspects of owning a home you should be aware of before you decide to purchase, especially if you are buying an older home. If you are purchasing a new build, then there is less likelihood of complications from a survey, although you should still have certain criteria satisfied.

 

Energy Performance Certificate (EPC)

The main regulation you should find useful is the Energy Performance Certificate, known as the EPC, which is mandatory for homes when they are built, sold or let. It covers aspects of thermal efficiency and gives your home a rating from A to G – A being the most efficient and thus likely to cost you less in energy bills. Now more than ever before, insulating your home is an important business, a topic we explore in our article Why is Property Insulation so Important?

 

Survey-Dependent Regulations

As Property Industry Eye discusses, there is a drive to reintroduce a compulsory pack for home sellers, like the defunct Home Information Pack. It was a short-lived method by which a seller put together a pack of information about their home prior to it going on the market, much like a survey but conducted before a buyer had been found. They were compulsory until May 2010, but a similar project has yet to become mandatory in the UK. That means in terms of regulations, the only other ones you need to be aware of are directly affected by your survey, usually conducted by your mortgage company ahead of any purchase.

These cannot be avoided, and they are intended to give your lender a clear picture of the property they are lending money against. These could throw up all manner of problems which need resolving before you are loaned money, or that you must pay attention to in the first six months of moving in.

Typically, older homes tend to fall foul of surveys, with electrics and damp being two of the key areas which you may have to look to carry out remedial work on. Electricity can be dangerous and in older homes, particularly those that have been advertised as ‘in need of modernisation’, you may have to have a full rewire carried out. Even if you only need certain parts of the system looked at, the NICEIC regulations are far-reaching and demand a qualified contractor to work on the property. Failed wiring, fuse box breakdowns, or even broken power sockets are all serious problems facing homeowners at any time, but in a new property you may not be aware of previous problems or potential ones.

However, HomeServe outlines how with electrical insurance cover you can protect yourself from any unforeseen dangers, and against the cost of expensive repairs in the event of breakdown or malfunction. It is especially important to pay attention to this aspect of your home not only when you move in, but in the months after the purchase. It is somewhat ironic that if you bought a faulty TV and the problem became apparent a week after you purchased it, you could return it, but you are afforded no such protection with your home.

 

Regulations-when-buying-new-home

 

If you are asked to carry out work that involves your gas supply, you will also need to consult a qualified engineered, one who is CORGI registered. This is less likely on a survey but is still something you should consider. Regulations around the following are not as stringent, and there is flexibility for you as the purchaser:

  • Plumbers
  • Decorators
  • Bricklayers

However, being cautious is still advisable even if the project does not demand a specific qualification, as electrics and gas do.

In terms of regulations that cover what you need to be aware of, the randomness of the survey is something to keep an eye out for. Some properties may have asbestos that needs removing, others may have bats in the loft – both of which are covered by certain regulations. If you are in any doubt, make sure you opt for a more expensive and thorough survey, as it is usually an option, and carefully pour over the recommendations and suggestions contained within.

This way, you can enjoy your new home not only when you move in, but for many years to come.


stamp-duty-renoavtion-jobs

How to Keep Building Sites Safe During Covid-19

The construction industry continues to boom during the pandemic. Following a quiet lockdown period from March to May, there has been a real eagerness to complete on properties and carry out renovations, making the most of the stamp duty cuts and trying to capitalise before another pandemic or lockdown emerges.

The property market continues to very busy, with a record number of mortgage approvals and applications for construction finance.

But with construction booming across the UK capital and other regions, it is important that any construction workers are still minimising any risk of the covid-19 pandemic spreading, especially for their colleagues and any clients living or working in their homes. Octagon provides some advice for keeping build sites safe during covid-19.

Allow for Open Spaces

Construction sites are typically in the open air - and this is something that reduces the risk of covid-19 spreading. However, as a site comes closer to completion, the spaces become enclosed, especially if you have the client living in the home at the same time. In this case, you have to take measures to make sure that windows are always open and that the spaces are not confined. You can also consider making areas just for workers or builders and not accessible for household members.

Hand Washing Stations

Using hand sanitisers or hand washing stations are important to avoid the germs and virus spreading. If you are bringing materials from different locations, you want to ensure that your hands are clean (or you are wearing gloves) and they are washed every time you leave and enter.

Some construction sites will already have hand washing stations, assuming there is a kitchen installed.

You can also access portal hand washing stations from the likes of Trovex, which are perfect for construction sites upon entry or exit - and they have also been used by schools and other places of interest.

hand-washing-stations

 

Regular Testing

It is not unreasonable to ask for and carry out regular covid-19 testing on builders and workers, especially if they are mixing households or working on multiple jobs. The result of one person or the entire team catching covid-19 could be detrimental to the workflow, deadline and become very costly.

Home testing kits for Covid-19 are available to order online and cost just a few pounds. But ideally you should try find the ones available in bulk so that you can carry out tests daily and for multiple staff members.

covid-testing-kits
Covid testing kits are available online for just a few pounds.

Wearing Masks When in Close Proximity to Others

Wearing the correct PPE is always important if you are not in the same bubbles. So if you have different specialists and builders coming in from different locations, the correct PPE such as masks and gloves will be important.

For the very least, you may need to wear masks and gloves or show that you are regularly washing your hands just to instil confidence in the client - and demonstrate that you are taking measures towards their safety and yours.


why-is-property-insulation-important

Why is Property Insulation so Important?

Home insulation is not a new concept in the UK, although it has had somewhat of a resurgence in the last few years This has culminated in the UK Government’s recent rolling out of their Green Homes Grant (more information), which provides homeowners and landlords with funding to make their properties greener and more energy efficient.

The responsibility for insulating and properly caring for properties in this way falls on whoever owns the property and therefore tenants and residents who have a landlord or management company will need to discuss improvements to insulation with the relevant, managing party.

 

Property-insulation

 

How Does It All Work?

The process of insulating a property and making it more energy efficient is fairly simple and there are a number of ways in which it can be achieved, with the most popular methods being:

  • Installing a new boiler
  • Installing double glazing
  • Loft insulation
  • Cavity wall insulation
  • Under-floor insulation

 

Installing a New Boiler

Older boilers are not as efficient as newer models, which utilise gas more efficiently. As boilers age, they also tend to run in to various problems (particularly when they are not properly serviced over the years) such as fan and motor problems and components of the boiler becoming aged and overused. Although it is entirely possible to keep boilers running for many decades, as time goes on, the boiler is more likely to use more gas less efficiently, being worse for the environment and your bills.

 

Installing Double Glazing

A tried and tested method for improving energy efficiency and improving the integrity of the building in question’s envelope (the barrier that separates the inside and outside environments.) The better the protection between the interior and exterior environments, the better heat will be retained in the cooler months and cooler air maintained in the hotter months. Also, double glazing will help keep the property at a more stable temperature, putting less strain on the heating and therefore boiler.

 

Loft Insulation

The loft or attic of a property is usually where much of the heat is lost from the property in question. Heat rises and therefore it is logical that the highest point of the property [the loft] ill be where a large amount of heat is lost. Insulating the loft and attic means that less heat will be lost and will be contained within your property, allowing for less work being required by the central heating and boiler.

 

Cavity Wall Insulation

In the case of many early 20th Century properties, there is a gap [cavity] between the interior wall of the property and the exterior wall. This was designed so that the elements outside such as the rain and moisture cannot penetrate into the property. However, a major drawback of these designs of property is that the cavity allows cold air to infiltrate by filling the cavity, the building envelope is better secured and the property will be more energy efficient, greener and better for the environment.

 

Under-Floor Insulation

Surprising to many people is that the underfloor region of their property is poorly insulated. Underneath the flooring you will have in your property, be it carpet or otherwise, there will be the floorboards and underneath will be the joists, supporting the floor and then usually, a gaping space. this space allows for cold air to penetrate, making the property less energy efficient. Fixing this by insulating this is a great way to improve the energy efficiency and retention of your property.


first-time-buyers

Will First-Time Buyers Set To Receive Low-Deposit Mortgage Deals?

Prime Minister Boris Johson has pledged 95% mortgages for two million first-time buyers. The Government unveiled plans for 'generation buy' at a virtual Conservative Party conference. The Prime Minister said: "We need now to take forward one of the key proposals of our manifesto of 2019: giving young, first-time buyers the chance to take out a long-term, fixed-rate mortgage of up to 95 percent of the value of the home — vastly reducing the size of the deposit."

 

How Will It Work?

The Government has revealed intentions to make 95% mortgages more extensively available for first-time buyers, but it is still uncertain how the proposals would work. The Prime Minister discussed the issue facing two million prospective first-time buyers who could afford to pay mortgage repayments but are having difficulty getting approved for a home loan. He believes the Government has a role to play in unlocking low-deposit loans to generate 'the biggest expansion of homeownership since the 1980s'.

The proposal is also reminiscent of government-backed low-deposit mortgage schemes introduced after the 2008 crash. A similar program was launched as part of the Help to Buy plan during the 2008 recession because of banks withdrawing their high loan-to-value mortgage products. Previously, there were 100 percent loans on offer for buyers.

The Government has not released any details on how the scheme might work. According to a report by The Telegraph, one prospective design is for banks to get rid of the rigorous stress tests that were introduced after the financial crash. Rather than the stress tests, the Government could impose a guarantee for these higher loans. This would remove the risk placed on lenders, allowing them to offer low-deposit loans without worry. The tests are designed to assess whether a buyer will keep up mortgage repayments should interest rates rise from their current rate of 0.1%.

 

How Could The Scheme Help First-Time Buyers?

Boris Johnson said that the scheme will help up to two million people who can afford mortgage repayments but can't currently find home loans. While high loan-to-value mortgages were widely offered at the begging of this year, the COVID lockdown caused many lenders to withdraw their products. Banks and building societies were inundated with a backlog of inquiries when the housing market reopened, and some became overwhelmed with the demand. The decision to remove the low-deposit mortgages may have been due to economic uncertainty - as the economy walks a tightrope many lenders wish to distance themselves from providing riskier loans. 

In theory, first-time buyers will be able to buy with a five percent deposit once again under the new proposals. The result hopes to "turn Generation Rent into Generation Buy." However, buyers should still be aware of the possible risks that remain. When you buy a property with a low deposit, there is often a greater risk of negative equity if the property market doesn't rise but instead declines. 


reduction-in-planning-permission

Home Truth: Lockdown Caused 21% Reduction in Planning Permission Applications

Lockdown Caused 21% Reduction in Planning Permission Applications

 

  • Same time period in 2019 saw only a 5% decrease from the year before
  • North East and Yorkshire & Humber saw the largest drop in planning permission applications during lockdown (27%)
  • 87% of planning permission applications were approved in 2020

 

New research from bridging loans broker Octagon Capital reveals that lockdown had a significant impact on the number of Brits applying for planning permission, with numbers from April, May and June 2020 down 21% on the same time period the year previously.

The research, which analysed gov.uk data, found that the decrease in planning permission applications during lockdown is far more significant than in 2019, where there was only a 5% decrease in applications during the second quarter of the year. In 2018, there was only a 3% decrease.

The good news for those who have applied for planning permission during lockdown is that the likelihood of having an application approved doesn’t seem to have been affected. 87% of planning permission applications in 2020 have been approved, marginally lower than the two years beforehand (88%).

Regionally, the North East and Yorkshire & Humber both saw a 27% drop in the percentage of planning permission applications between the second quarter of 2020 and the same period of 2019, the largest in the country. On the other hand, the South West has seen a 17% decrease, which is the lowest.

 

See also:

Rise in mortgage approvals 'highest in 13 years'

Dan Kettle: 'Bridging volumes halve in Q2'

Sunak approves stamp duty change

 

Percentage difference in the number of planning permission applications between Q2 2019 and Q2 2020

 

Region

Percentage Difference in Planning Permission Applications, Q2 2019 – Q2 2020

North East

-27%

Yorkshire & Humber

-27%

North West

-23%

East of England

-22%

South East

-22%

West Midlands

-20%

East Midlands

-19%

London

-19%

South West

-17%

 

Planning permission applications in the North East were the most likely to be approved during lockdown, with a 94% approval rating. Meanwhile, only 79% of applications from London were approved, the lowest rate nationwide.

Dan Kettle, Commercial Director at Octagon Capital, commented: “COVID-19 has impacted every aspect of our lives, but the 21% drop in the number of planning permission applications during lockdown is particularly telling when it comes to looking at how Brits are prioritising their finances during a difficult time.

“There are positives from this research for those who still want to expand, for example to build a home office to help them work from home. The approval rate for planning permission applications has remained high and at the similar level to 2019. The best way to ensure your application is approved is to do your research beforehand and bringing in an architect to ensure your plans are up to scratch.”

To find out more about Octagon Capital and how planning permission has been impacted by lockdown, visit: https://octagoncapital.co.uk/guides/lockdown-caused-21-reduction-in-planning-permission-applications/


stamp duty

How Does The Stamp Duty Holiday Work?

What is stamp duty?

Stamp Duty Land Tax is a tax on the purchase of properties. Stamp duty is only paid in England and Northern Ireland. The devolved administrations of Scotland and Wales have alternative property taxes (Land and Buildings Transaction Tax and Land Transaction Tax, respectively). How much tax you owe the government depends on the property value, and where you are in the UK. The temporary changes to stamp duty currently in place only apply in England and Northern Ireland.

 

What has changed?

The threshold for stamp duty has been increased temporarily to £500,000 for properties in England and Northern Ireland. This applies to anyone purchasing their primary residence. If your property costs up to £500,000, you will not pay any stamp duty. Higher-value properties will only be taxed on their cost above that amount, potentially saving buyers tens of thousands of pounds.

 

stamp duty

Before the new policy was introduced in July, buyers paid stamp duty in England and Northern Ireland on land or property with a value of £125,000 or more. The first-time buyer discount allowed those entering the property market to pay no stamp duty up to £300,000 but is now replaced by the stamp duty holiday.

Landlords and second-home buyers will also see a tax cut but will still be eligible to pay the extra 3% stamp duty that has always been allocated to them. 

 

Who benefits? 

The stamp duty holiday was put in place to help buyers in a time when many are facing financial hardships as a result of the coronavirus. Chancellor Rishi Sunak has suggested that with the new policy, the average saved on a stamp duty bill is £4,500. Moreover, nearly nine out of ten home buyers this year will pay no stamp duty at all.

While it is aimed at buyers, homeowners are also benefiting and pocketing some extra money. With the policy in place, homeowners have more of an incentive to keep their asking price high, knowing that the buyer is saving on stamp duty. This is particularly significant with the sale of high-value properties which can run a stamp duty bill of tens of thousands of pounds. The stamp duty savings will likely end up being shared, with both buyers and sellers managing to save.

 

How have house prices been affected?

The Stamp Duty holiday intended to boost the property market after it took a hit during lockdown when house prices fell consecutively for four months. The stamp duty tax holiday has already taken effect by increasing house prices. In August, prices accelerated the most in one month for more than 16 years, according to Nationwide. They describe the sudden recovery as 'unexpectedly rapid'.

On the other hand, fears have begun to muster that the tax break will encourage those who were intending to buy next year to advance their plans. This could create a vast drop in demand when the tax break ends.

 

 

 When does the stamp duty holiday end?

The stamp duty holiday in England and Northern Ireland is nine-months long. It began in July 2020 and will end in March 2021. According to HMRC figures, the government usually raises around £12 billion annually from stamp duty land tax. Though, the tax holiday is set to cost the Treasury an estimated £3.8 billion.


What is Regulated and Unregulated in Bridging Finance?

Bridging loans or bridge finance, will typically fall under regulated or unregulated activity - and this can have quite an impact on the application process, eligibility and terms that you receive. In this article, Octagon Capital aims to explain the difference between regulated and unregulated bridging - and how you can find the best product for you.

As a rule of thumb:

  • Any residential bridging is regulated (if it is their primary residence)
  • Any commercial bridging is unregulated (including offices, garages, warehouses)

 

Regulated Bridging Unregulated Bridging
70% Maximum LTV 75% Maximum LTV
First and Second Charge Mostly Second Charge
Subject to Status All Credit Statuses Considered

What is the regulation for bridging loans?

When it comes to regulated bridging loans, the FCA is the main regulator in the UK for any mortgages or deals. Essentially, they have strict regulation and guidelines in place to ensure that borrowers do not risk losing their primary residence when borrowing and there is adequate protection in place.

So typically, you can borrow against residential properties, such as buying a place for buy-to-let purposes. However, you cannot borrow a regulated bridging loan if it is secured against your own primary residence.

Part of this is the Mortgage Credit Directive (MCD) which is an EU framework for mortgage firms and is overseen by the FCA. There are a number of measures in place to offer transparency to customers, such as showing them any rates beforehand as an APRC and also giving applicants a reflective period in case they want to change their mind or request more information.

For the regulation surrounding SMCR, this is for senior managers of investment firms under the FCA - and does not apply in this case.

 

bridging finance

Borrowing against flats and places of primary residence will typically fall under regulated activity

 

Regulated bridging loans and mortgages are available by first charge or second charge

First charge loans

This refers to the 'first charge' that is taken from your bank account each month, so often refers to as your first mortgage, which could be against your main residence and property that you live at, or an investment.

Second charge loans

This refers to the 'second charge' from your bank account, taken out after your first charge. So you could have a mortgage against your home (this is your first charge) and then another mortgage or bridging loan against an investment product (this is your second charge). You can also get a second charge against your existing home, known commonly as a second mortgage.

Importantly, the amount you can borrow on your second charge is less than your first charge, since it is second in the queue when it comes to repayments each month.

You can use the same lender for both first and second charge, or use a different one for each.

 

What is unregulated bridging loans?

When bridging loans are unregulated, they are conforming to some essential guidelines, but there are a lot of flexibilities when it comes to the criteria and lending to people with adverse credit histories. Loans in this nature are commonly by means of second charge, and with faster processing and applications, they typically make up around 50% to 60% of all bridging deals (regulated rarely gets more business than unregulated in this sector).

Unregulated business is often for commercial properties including:

  • Offices
  • Petrol garages
  • Schools/ Hotels/ Farmhouses
  • Warehouses
  • Factories
  • Gyms
  • Other business purposes

 

bridging-loans
Offices will typically fall under unregulated activity

 

What does non-status bridging loans mean?

Non-status bridging means that it does not take credit status into account. So where regulated mortgages and most financial products require a strong credit score, this is not the case with non-status lending. Therefore, lenders are willing to take a view on adverse credit histories or limited credit histories and may look at other factors such as the potential value of your property and the opportunity.